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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

3 edition of Predicative adjectives with the copula bytʹ in modern russian found in the catalog.

Predicative adjectives with the copula bytʹ in modern russian

Sven Gustavsson

Predicative adjectives with the copula bytʹ in modern russian

by Sven Gustavsson

  • 270 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Almqvist & Wiksell in Stockholm .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Russian language -- Verb phrase.,
  • Russian language -- Adjective.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 392-399.

    StatementSven Gustavsson ; [Publ. by the University of Stockholm].
    SeriesStockholm Slavic studies ;, 10, Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis., 10.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPG2380 .G8
    The Physical Object
    Pagination399 p. ;
    Number of Pages399
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4597843M
    ISBN 109122000763
    LC Control Number77360550

    Predicative adjectives are linked via a copula or other linking mechanism to the noun or pronoun they modify; for example, happy is a predicate adjective in "they are happy" and in "that made me happy." (See also: Predicative expression, Subject complement.). copular predicate must appear in the f-structureeven for the present tense in which it is absent. Whether this copular predicate is open or closed depends on other patterns in the language in question. For the present tense case with no overt copula, the main predicate could be provided by annotations on the phrase structure rules.

    predicate adjectives in our word-class, as practically all. Soviet lingidsts do Short predicate adjectives occur in an entirely different set of environments. They do not. stand alone, i.e., they are used with a subject. Further-more, short predicate adjectives are inflected for gender and number, and therefore should not be included in any. In that sentence, the noun phrase the book is the subject, the verb is serves as the copula, and the prepositional phrase on the table is the predicative expression. The whole expression is on the table may (in some theories of grammar) be called a predicate or a verb phrase.

    Subject (NOMINATIVE) + copula + predicate (NOMINATIVE) In modern Polish and Russian (and on that basis I assume all Slavic although I do not have solid information on that) the same construction looks like this: Subject (NOMINATIVE) + copula + predicate (INSTRUMENTAL) I don't know about Russian, but in Polish this applies only to predicative nominals. In the predicative adjectives the predicate stands in nominative . The "moving wall" represents the time period between the last issue available in JSTOR and the most recently published issue of a journal. Moving walls are generally represented in years. In rare instances, a publisher has elected to have a "zero" moving wall, so their current issues are available.


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Predicative adjectives with the copula bytʹ in modern russian by Sven Gustavsson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Gustavsson, Sven, Predicative adjectives with the copula bytʹ in modern russian. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell, Predicative adjectives with the copula bytʹ in modern Russian Gustavsson, Sven Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures.

: Studies in the Modern Russian Language: 4. The Expression of the Passive Voice, and 5. Agreement of the Verb-Predicate with a Collective Subject (): W Harrison, J. Summary. This book is concerned with the variation in the form of predicate adjectives with the copula byt ´ (‘to be’) in contemporary Russian, as in (1), (2) and (3).

The paper explores the mapping between the syntax and semantics of copular sentences in Russian in comparison to English. It argues for a single underlying semantics of the copula in predicational Author: Ljudmila Geist.

Download Citation | Interactive properties: Modern Russian predicate adjectives in affirmative and negative contexts | When discussing case variation in Modern Russian predicate adjectives Author: Renee Perelmutter. Position of objective personal pronouns: a study of word order in modern Russian: Gustavsson, Sven: Predicative adjectives with the copula bytʹ in modern Russian: Björling, Fiona: Stolbcy by Nikolaj Zabolockij: analyses: Nilsson, Barbro: Old Russian derived nominals in -nie, -tie: a syntactical study: Rūķe-Draviņa.

This paper explores the difference between the short form (SF) and the long form (LF) of predicate adjectives in Russian. It shows that the morphosyntactic and semantic differences between the two Author: Ljudmila Geist.

The present paper deals with the “semantic approach” (cf. Bailyn) to the variations of predicate nominals in Russian copular sentences which starts from the assumption that there is Author: Julia Kuznetsova.

In languages that have morphological case, predicative nominals typically appear in the nominative case (e.g., German and Russian) or instrumental case (e.g. Russian), although predicative expressions over objects generally bear the same case as the object.

Some languages lack an equivalent of the copula be. Williams () and Partee () argued that specificational sentences like (2) result from “inversion around the copula”: that NP1 is a predicate (type) and NP2 is the subject, a Author: Barbara Partee. Four of the contributions investigate the syntax of adjectives in a variety of languages (English, French, Mandarin Chinese, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Spanish, and Serbocroatian).

The theoretical issues explored include: the syntax of attributive and predicative adjectives, the syntax of nominalized adjectives and the identification of adjectives as a distinct lexical category in Mandarin Chinese.

Predicative Adverbs. This group of adverbs stands quite apart in Russian grammar. Syntactically, these adverbs express the predicate of impersonal sentences. The logical subject (when there is one) stands in the dative case. These adverbs may refer to: 1. Russian Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the Russian language.

in Russian, one can distinguish between nouns and predicative adjectives, even though no articles are used, because the two are declined differently. Это -- не честнo. This series is primarily concerned with such instances where, in Russian, the predicate is denoted by means other than a finite verb, i.e., by infinite verbal forms (infinitives and gerunds) as well as nonverbal forms, including the zero-morpheme of the copula verb.

Understanding the Copula The copula is one of the most awkward areas of Irish syntax to master. This is not helped by the fact that the promoters of an artificial ‘Standard Irish’ have muddied the waters with a confused explanation that in turn requires numerous exceptions to make it fit the language.

Gearóid Ó Nualláin. – (på eng) Predicative adjectives with the copula bytʹ in modern Russian. Stockholm Slavic studies, ; Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell international.

Libris länk. ISBN – Gustavsson Sven, Svanberg Ingvar, red. Gamla folk och nya stater: det upplösta Sovjetimperiet.

Stockholm: Gidlund. Libris länk. Four of the contributions investigate the syntax of adjectives in a variety of languages (English, French, Mandarin Chinese, Modern Hebrew, Russian, Spanish, and Serbocroatian).

The theoretical issues explored include: the syntax of attributive and predicative adjectives, the syntax of nominalized adjectives and the identification of adjectives.

Zero copula is a linguistic phenomenon whereby the subject is joined to the predicate without overt marking of this relationship. One can distinguish languages that simply do not have a copula and languages that have a copula that is optional in some contexts.

Many languages exhibit this in some contexts, including Assamese, Bengali, Kannada, Malay/Indonesian, Turkish, Japanese, Ukrainian, Russian. That's right. In English there are two main uses for be: (1) to mark non-verbal predicates (predicate adjectives and predicate nouns), and (2) to mark verbal constructions, like the Passive and the adjectives and nouns fall under (1), but there are a lot of other syntactic constructions that use participles are not adjectives, though they can be used as attributive.

In English grammar, a copula is a verb that joins the subject of a sentence or clause to a subject example, the word "is" functions as a copula in the sentences "Jane is my friend" and "Jane is friendly." The primary verb "be" is sometimes referred to as "the copula." However, while forms of "being" (am, are, is, was, were) are the most commonly used copulas in English, certain Author: Richard Nordquist.In Old Russian sources, active participles were often used with verbs of independent predication.3 "Ubojasja pobeže Olegü." (Hypatian An-nals).

The verb of independent predication pobeže serves as the copula for the present active participle ubojasja, which modifies the subject Olegü. In modern Russian a gerund would be used instead of a.This chapter shows how the proposed analysis can account for apparently unrelated phenomena in Russian, namely the morphological (short or long) form of the predicate and case assignment with respect to the alternation between nominative and instrumental marking.

It shows that short-form adjectives must be treated as dense predicates; while long forms are either non-dense (and then .